Veggie Crackers

What’s a great way to preserve your harvest, contain it in a lightweight and easily storable form that doesn’t require freezing and not have to break your back and a sweat hauling water to your canner?  The answer: dehydrated veggie crackers.

All that’s needed is your produce of choice, a few nuts and seeds (for binding power), a food processor (I’m convinced no kitchen should be without one) and a dehydrator lined with parchment paper.

Last week a lot of the interns on various farms in Chimacum/Port Townsend met together at Solstice Farm B&B for a cracker making event consisting of a dozen pairs of hands helping to rinse, drain, chop, grind, pour, taste, spread and dehydrate; condensing bucket loads of produce into compact, crunchy bites. 

Virtually any combination you could think of is possible.  Our ingredients ranged from kale and chard, beets and their greens, summer squash, pumpkin seeds, soaked rye berries, fresh dill, mint and basil to sprouted lentils, reconstituted sun-dried tomatoes, sauerkraut, pickle juice and even cocoa powder (though not all in the same batch.)  The results were colorful spreads reminiscent of hummus or pate on the dehydrator trays.

Here’s some of the combinations we came up with, feel free to use whatever you have on hand and what sounds or tastes good to you – sweet, savory, sour or spicy.  You could compress an entire meal into one of these cracker combos making the perfect trail or travel food!

#1:
sprouted lentils
carrots
toasted sunflower seeds
cooked white rice
kraut juice
dried onion
ground flaxseed
salt
fresh mint
summer squash
garlic

#2:
beet greens
ground flaxseed
salt
sauerkraut
garlic
dried onion
fresh basil

#3
sauerkraut
sprouted rye berries
toasted sunflower seeds
ground flaxseed
fresh rosemary
dried onion
a tad bit of honey

 

 

#4:
lacinato kale
cooked grits
sauerkraut
toasted sunflower seeds
ground flaxseed
pumpkin seeds (mixed and as a garnish)

#5:
dill
chard
kraut
pickle juice
salt
garlic

 

 

 

#6:
beets
beet greens
kale
cooked white rice
soaked sunflower seeds
ground flaxseed
honey
salt
cocoa powder

*It’s best to put larger material in the food-processor first so it can break down a bit; some liquid is helpful at this stage.  Grains or dried nuts/seeds are good next and you want to finish with things like the flaxseed or soaked nuts/seeds and honey.  And flax seeds really do make the best binder – you don’t need too many, and a coffee grinder (for herb use only – coffee residue will taint anything it comes in contact with) is great for breaking the hard outer shell of the flax.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s